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Budweiser brings environmentally friendly beer cans to Europe

New metal-making technology doesn’t emit carbon dioxide.
Image: Bloomberg

Anheuser-Busch InBev SA/NV, the largest brewer in the world, is bringing its low-carbon beer cans to Europe this year.

The company’s UK arm is teaming up with Russian aluminum producer United Co Rusal International PJSC, which will provide aluminum for five million cans using new metal-making technology that doesn’t emit carbon dioxide. AB InBev started putting beer in similar cans in North America a year ago.

We “want to make it as easy as possible for people to choose environmentally-friendly options in their day-to-day lives,” Mauricio Coindreau, a sustainability director for Budweiser Brewing Group in the UK

The move comes as more consumers push companies to get serious about climate change and transform their behavior when it comes to responsible sourcing of raw materials that go into products. CANPACK UK will produce the cans using renewable electricity, according to the statement.

Aluminum-can demand has surged since the beginning of the pandemic as consumers stocked up on drinks at home after lockdowns forced restaurants and bars to shutter. The benchmark aluminum price traded in London is up more than 44% this year as reopening economies across the globe boost demand for everything from automobiles to washing machines.

© 2021 Bloomberg

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A positive story.

The only carbon imprint I can think of, is when you place such (unopened) beer can on the rifle range’s 100-meter mark, and the burnt powder released from the tiny .22LR cartridge adding its 0,0000003 gram/CO2 to the atmosphere.

(…if scope is set correctly, one would only need to fire ONCE, limiting CO2 impact)

The biggest waste is in a perfectly drinkable beer, absorbed by dry soil.

I wouldn’t waste my nice beer for this purpose.
I truly wonder if the Russian aluminium manufacturer Rusal is honest and open, when they claim that they don’t produce CO2 in production.
Typical aluminium smelting, getting it out of the ore bauxite, uses massive amounts of electricity. I don’t believe Russia has switched over to considerable use if renewables, as they have plenty of coal, oil and gas.

End of comments.

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