Proudly sponsored by

South Africa sets rule to lower sulfur in diesel fuel by 2023

As climate-change regulations prompt a shift away from traditional fuels.

South Africa published regulations that lower the sulfur content allowed in the country’s diesel fuel, which may force some oil refineries to upgrade in order to meet the standards.

Diesel grades allowed for sale may not exceed 10 parts per million, or ppm, according to a government notice on petroleum product regulations dated August 31. The rules will come into effect in September 2023.

Moneyweb Insider INSIDERGOLD

Subscribe for full access to all our share and unit trust data tools, our award-winning articles, and support quality journalism in the process.

Choose an option:

R63 per month
R630 per year SAVE R126

You will be redirected to a checkout page.
To view all features and options, click here.

A monthly subscription is charged pro rata, based on the day of purchase. This is non-refundable and includes a R5 once-off sign-up fee.
A yearly subscription is refundable within 14 days of purchase and includes a 365-day membership.

Click here for more information.

Climate-change regulations are prompting a shift away from traditional fuels. Many of South Africa’s oil refineries will need to upgrade equipment in order to meet new standards, and may not be competitive operating with their current configurations. Some plants are evaluating their options, while others are converting to terminals capable of importing cleaner fuels.

The higher 50ppm grade accounts for the majority of South Africa’s diesel consumption, according to a 2018 presentation by the South African Petroleum Industry Association. It said at the time that “10 ppm production may present a severe challenge.”

© 2021 Bloomberg

COMMENTS   2

Sort by:
  • Oldest first
  • Newest first
  • Top voted

You must be signed in to comment.

SIGN IN SIGN UP

And so comes to the end our refinery of diesel in this country !!

There’s a lot more to this story… the truth is our fuel refining in general is not keeping up with world standards as more and more auto manufacturers move to smaller, turbo-charged vehicles.

Apparently, there is a big bill associated with upgrading our fuel refineries and for years now there’s been a stalemate between government and the fuel companies as to who should pick up the tab for this expense. Meanwhile we continue to fall behind.

Diesel also contains more pollutants and governments worldwide are mandating better quality diesel (or, ideally, no diesel at all) to improve air quality.

End of comments.

LATEST CURRENCIES  

USD / ZAR
GBP / ZAR
EUR / ZAR
BTC / USD

Podcasts

INSIDER SUBSCRIPTIONS APP VIDEOS RADIO / LISTEN LIVE SHOP OFFERS WEBINARS NEWSLETTERS TRENDING PORTFOLIO TOOL CPD HUB

Follow us:

Search Articles:
Click a Company: