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Two-thirds of businesses around the world are struggling to hire

Businesses across surveyed countries reported stronger hiring outlooks for the end of this year compared to the final three months of 2020.
Image: Shutterstock

Businesses around the world want to hire but face a similar dilemma: attracting workers.

A survey of nearly 45 000 employers across 43 countries showed 69% of employers reported difficulty filling roles, a 15-year high, according to employment-services provider ManpowerGroup. At the same time, 15 countries — focused in Europe and North America — reported their highest hiring intentions since the survey began in 1962.

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Businesses across all surveyed countries reported stronger hiring outlooks for the end of this year compared to the final three months of 2020.

“Continued talent shortages mean many businesses are prioritizing retaining and training workers with the skills they need to succeed as the economic recovery continues,” Jonas Prising, chief executive officer of ManpowerGroup, said in a statement.

About 40% of respondents said they offer training and skills development to attract and retain talent. A similar share reported offering flexible work schedules. Nearly a third increased wages. Others offered signing bonuses and more vacation time.

The incentives differ by industry, with financial service companies most likely to offer training and development and flexible work locations while manufacturers often raised pay or offered more flexible schedules.

© 2021 Bloomberg

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Jip, until you hit your fifties. Firstly, the cANCer virus dictates that you will be replaced by a younger, different skin colour person because cANCer said so. Never mind experience, cognitive ability, experience – that is so old school First World like, who needs it? Just as long as there are the necessary papers from some university/ college. Secondly, the remaining whiteys will cover for you, even uptalk your consistent underperformance because their bonuses and job security depend on it. Thirdly, the West is talking, and in some cases, have increased the retirement age due to skill shortages, longevity, state pensions.

I got my answer.

In the first world, 2/3 of businesses struggle to find employees and stock markets are twice and three times our prices.

That is why first world investment ideas do not work in South Africa.

Look at our fantastic resources/commodity shares? P/E of 3 and 5
They are super cheap and yet they keep crashing.

What is wrong?

Perhaps these pearls cannot be bought because our sovereign credit rating is sub-par?

“What is wrong?” The mindset of the labour force.

End of comments.

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