Trending on Moneyweb
Top articles and comments, based on the Moneyweb Insiders activity.
The top shared articles of past 24hours.
    Emma Rumney, Reuters / 18 February 2019 The banks say the firm poses a 'reputational risk' for them as clients.
     105      16
    Duncan McLeod / 18 February 2019 The allegations centre on a contract, worth R120m.
     52      9
    Ryk van Niekerk / 18 February 2019 Investec’s John Biccard, a 'rock star' in the deep value investor club, shares his views on where there's value at the moment.
     39      2
    Ingé Lamprecht / 19 February 2019 Biggest short-term challenge is Eskom.
     22      3
    Antoinette Slabbert / 19 February 2019 Turnaround on track, but R4bn needed for 2019/20.
     21      10
    Patrick Cairns / 19 February 2019 Which is why it's so hard to pick them.
     17      9
    Antoinette Slabbert / 19 February 2019 R100bn request 'understates severity of problem'.
     11      12
    Suren Naidoo / 18 February 2019 Company calls for swift conclusion to investigation into alleged share-price manipulation.
     10      1
    Victor Mupunga / 18 February 2019 Naspers now holds an 18% weight in the index, compared to just 2% a decade ago.
     9      3
    Samantha Machado and Barbara Lewis, Reuters / 18 February 2019 The appointment of Richard Duffy as CEO would benefit the company as it sought to cut debt, analysts say.
     6      0
    Olivia Kumwenda-Mtambo and Tiisetso Motsoeneng, Reuters / 18 February 2019 The airline will be reorganised into domestic, regional and international business units, each with its own management - CEO.
     4      15
    Bloomberg / 18 February 2019 Passenger vehicle wholesales fell 17.7% year-on-year, the biggest drop since the market began to contract in the middle of last year.
     4      0
    Moneyweb / 18 February 2019 Banks close company's accounts citing reputational risks.
     4      2
    David Lerche / 19 February 2019 SA's 'anaemic economic growth' may have hampered the earnings growth of its smaller listed entities, but that doesn't mean we should write them off.
     3      0
    Karin Strohecker, Reuters / 18 February 2019 Wall Street futures suggested that US stocks would hold onto last week's gains when trading starts.
     3      1
    Moneyweb / 18 February 2019 In total, the deal is worth R330 million. 
     3      0
    Gregor Stuart Hunter, Bloomberg / 18 February 2019 Sustainable investment is well entrenched in developed countries, particularly in Europe, where it controls the largest share of assets globally.
     3      1
    Olivia Kumwenda-Mtambo and Nqobile Dludla, Reuters / 18 February 2019 Improved global sentiment, rand hedges lift stocks.
     2      0
    Moneyweb / 18 February 2019 Miner's position supported by focus on costs, higher basket prices.
     2      0
    Kartik Goyal, Bloomberg / 18 February 2019 Losses in Indian assets have deepened since Thursday, when a suicide bomber rammed his explosive-laden vehicle into a bus ferrying security forces.
     1      0
The top shared articles of the past 7 days.
    Duncan McLeod / 15 February 2019 The company plans to spend R500m covering Johannesburg with CCTV systems.
     384      39
    Hilton Tarrant / 18 February 2019 The National Water and Sanitation Master Plan is sombre reading.
     348      40
    Ingé Lamprecht / 18 February 2019 Local cash has outperformed equities over five years, leaving investors to wonder if something has changed.
     139      8
    Patrick Cairns / 13 February 2019 They can, but there are good reasons to believe that it's becoming less likely.
     125      17
    Suren Naidoo / 15 February 2019 Settlement brings final end to 14-year spat.
     117      18
    Duncan McLeod / 12 February 2019 EOH says Microsoft did not give any reasons for terminating the agreements.
     109      11
    Emma Rumney, Reuters / 18 February 2019 The banks say the firm poses a 'reputational risk' for them as clients.
     105      16
    Ray Mahlaka / 18 February 2019 Treasury proposals a sign of its determination to get tough.
     105      18
    James-Brent Styan / 14 February 2019 Ramaphosa has no choice but to draw a line in the sand over the next few weeks.
     101      49
    Hilton Tarrant / 15 February 2019 Some arguments ignore the data, many are simply missing the point …
     93      19
    Bill Rawson / 17 February 2019 Consider your joint property ownership as a business agreement, never skip the contract.
     76      1
    Carrie Furman / 16 February 2019 Retirement fund contributions can help to reduce your tax bill in the current year, or over the future tax years.
     67      1
    Mike Schüssler / 13 February 2019 Fewer deaths, fewer births … there is no ‘population explosion’ in SA.
     64      59
    Patrick Cairns / 13 February 2019 The keys to any financial plan.
     58      6
    Patrick Cairns / 14 February 2019 As uptake increases significantly.
     53      3
    Moneyweb / 13 February 2019 The company has made investments worth R1.2 billion with a specific focus on Gauteng.
     53      1
    Duncan McLeod / 18 February 2019 The allegations centre on a contract, worth R120m.
     52      9
    Antoinette Slabbert / 13 February 2019 But much will depend on how the three individual assets are valued, and what portion of the utility’s crippling debt each is given.
     52      42
    Patrick Cairns / 18 February 2019 The importance of good capital allocation.
     48      16
    Dave Mohr and Izak Odendaal / 13 February 2019 The bigger drivers of the rand are global not local commodity prices and investor sentiment towards emerging markets.
     46      3
The top shared articles of the past month.
    Antoinette Slabbert / 12 February 2019 Eskom power shortage may deepen, large users say.
     696      68
    Moneyweb / 11 February 2019 As its investment models are brought into question, the retailer is again accused of plagiarism.
     635      4
    Suren Naidoo / 25 January 2019 'Complete lifestyle destination' set to take title from Carlton Centre.
     515      13
    Duncan McLeod / 15 February 2019 The company plans to spend R500m covering Johannesburg with CCTV systems.
     384      39
    Hilton Tarrant / 18 February 2019 The National Water and Sanitation Master Plan is sombre reading.
     348      40
    Hilton Tarrant / 11 February 2019 This is nothing less than a failure of the board.
     329      10
    Ingé Lamprecht / 29 January 2019 The Stig of financial blogging unpacks his journey towards financial independence.
     326      39
    Suren Naidoo / 23 January 2019 Rural communities have cultivated the wild fruit, known as the ‘elephant fruit’, for centuries.
     323      9
    Antoinette Slabbert / 7 February 2019 It is painful to see how the plant is operated, says supplier.
     315      31
    Ruaan van Eeden / 27 January 2019 Under the new legislation, SA tax residents abroad will be required to pay tax of up to 45% of their foreign employment income.
     283      30
    Ciaran Ryan / 4 February 2019 When the taps run dry and the lights go out.
     259      38
    Suren Naidoo / 23 January 2019 Inkunzi Wealth founder plans to raise R250m privately for student housing development.
     250      13
    Ingé Lamprecht / 25 January 2019 Beware the pitfalls.
     249      15
    Mike Schüssler / 5 February 2019 Is there a bigger disaster on earth than SA’s unemployment rate?
     238      39
    Stealthy Wealth / 8 February 2019 A fixed rate means your monthly payment won’t change when the prime lending rate rises or falls. So what's not to love? A lot, actually.
     220      13
    Ryk van Niekerk / 21 January 2019 Automation assists in making less emotional investment decisions.
     193      14
    Antoinette Slabbert / 4 February 2019 Eskom discloses details about 'design defects'.
     188      17
    Antoinette Slabbert / 25 January 2019 Down from 98 as amendments to business rescue plan mooted.
     182      6
    Ingé Lamprecht / 1 February 2019 With limited room to raise additional revenue through tax rate hikes.
     176      27
    Antoinette Slabbert / 21 January 2019 The DA responds and says: 'Look at the scoreboard'.
     170      37
The latest 20 comments.
  1. Paining

    19 February 2019 @ 9:34 am
  2. The likelihood of anyone being charged depends on the level of political "connections". If a politician is involved, they are safe.
  3. Gone AWOL

    19 February 2019 @ 9:31 am
  4. Government has signaled that the tax payer will foot the bill. Not R100 billion, not R200 billion, but the whole thing. Once municipalities know the tax payer on the hook, no incentive for them to pay either. What tax payers in SA need to signal to government is that they are not going to pay a dime for the mismanagement. Tax revolt is the only way. SARS can take on a % of tax revolters, but they can't handle a countrywide revolt.
  5. Paining

    19 February 2019 @ 9:20 am
  6. Not only "right size" but right competencies.
  7. ChrisinC

    19 February 2019 @ 9:20 am
  8. The other point to note, is that in hindsight a large US concentrated tech fund would have beaten the S&P over the last 10 years - but did you know this 10 years ago? And will it do so over the next 10 years? Probably not.
  9. Milo Compton

    19 February 2019 @ 9:19 am
  10. I'm thinking the same thing. We need a managed decay of Eskom into obscurity. Call it "Decaying with style" and let Eskom quietly wither and die.
  11. David Brent

    19 February 2019 @ 9:18 am
  12. Nationalise the Reserve Bank and print a R200 billion note. What could be easier?
  13. Paining

    19 February 2019 @ 9:17 am
  14. Unfortunately it is the Taxpayer, not the government, who is bailing Eskom out. The taxpayer who has no say, either as a voter (mostly in the minority) or as a consumer (prices will still rise way above inflation). Screwed from both ends.
  15. grahamcr

    19 February 2019 @ 9:12 am
  16. Tito should introduce a special tax on all SoE's its staff and all ANC political employees from president downwards. Call the tax "pay back the money tax" - can be set at 5% of gross monthly salary and is recoverable until 2060 or beyond in need. If an employee resigns then funds to be taken from their pension funds - thus no escaping culpability
  17. edalsg

    19 February 2019 @ 9:11 am
  18. You miss the point completely johannes!! Where else could our honourable MP,s fly free in Business class tgether with Family and friends ?? Maybe simply renaming SAA as ANC Airways would help. Have not for 20 yrs & will not ever fly SAA or its Mini me Mango again , on Principle !!
  19. Paul Kearney

    19 February 2019 @ 9:07 am
  20. If applied broadly I agree Jaco. But I think targeted legislation, maybe like that for biker gangs in parts of Australia, should be applied to auditors. In SA, they have probably caused more damage than the biker gangs in Oz.
  21. TheSpeculator

    19 February 2019 @ 9:04 am
  22. Please use the PIC money to pay for SAA.
  23. TheSpeculator

    19 February 2019 @ 9:02 am
  24. If you borrow money to SAA, the Tax payer will always have to pay. With SAA they will one day repossess our cars, furniture and houses. Use the PIC money (State pension money).
  25. Tertius Troost

    19 February 2019 @ 8:49 am
  26. Jip, its going to be an interesting Budget Speech this year. I still think the Debt-to-GDP ratio will be critical and give us a good understanding of our current fiscal situation. Let's hope Minister Tito Mboweni can keep it at a manageable level.
  27. HelloWTF

    19 February 2019 @ 8:38 am
  28. The cost base needs to be sorted first. It involves rightsizing the workforce. Until this is done raising money is simply throwing more of it down the drain.
  29. boomgloom

    19 February 2019 @ 8:38 am
  30. "The wasted money could be spent much better on essential schools, hospitals etc" Screw poor people, I want business class.
  31. JTB

    19 February 2019 @ 8:33 am
  32. You may also wish to read https://www.marketwatch.com/story/why-way-fewer-actively-managed-funds-beat-the-sp-than-we-thought-2017-04-24
  33. Illphil

    19 February 2019 @ 8:29 am
  34. Andrade - last time I looked, Brait was listed on JSE and therefor R31bn dividends would be paid in ZAR Hope that clears the issue for you.
  35. ps

    19 February 2019 @ 8:29 am
  36. AGO can keep the payroll going from its apparently copious cash reserves.
  37. Johannes

    19 February 2019 @ 8:15 am
  38. What is still baffling me from the anc / government is to still try and keep the SAA afloat at the cost of the taxpayer. It probably had a right to exist 20 years ago in the boycott days of south africa – but those days are something of the past and many airways are available to choose from. Why try and keep something that does not generate enough money to just break even alive when it is an actual unnecessary entity???? – for an anc minister to see a SAA plan in New York and to be proud about it while it is actually an outdated aeroplane???? SAA announces: “we want to get the 17-year old court case behind us, pay R1050 million rand + interest and continue with our business” what business?? – business run at a loss at the cost of the taxpayer. – wonder where the R1050 million rand will come from?? The wasted money could be spent much better on essential schools, hospitals etc than on an actual stillborn to try and get it alive and well – under the current government’s management quality levels and ability it will not happen in the next 100 years. Same for Eskom – its days are quickly running out due to pathetic management – if one can actually call it management at all.
  39. JTB

    19 February 2019 @ 8:13 am
  40. In terms of rand-denominated global equity fund performance, yet again the passives funds predictably outperform the actives. This is very notewrothy, because, in principle, a global fund manager has his/her greatest opportunity at outperformance when he has the whole world as his investment oyster. He/she has the opportunity of exploiting every last bit of mispricing by that mispricing fool called Mr. Market may present. It is worth wondering why the smartest minds in the investment world fail so dismally do so in these global (and other) funds. If you like active fund managers and want to lose more money, please feel free to be involved in a large wager on the outcome of your 2 selected SA active global fund mangers against the above 2 passives over the next 10 years The Sygnia S&P 500 is the cheapest and best performing S&P ETF (Total Investment Cost 0.21%) https://www.moneyweb.co.za/investing/how-should-investors-evaluate-sas-sp-500- The Sygnia World (9th out of 47 rand denominated global funds and ETFS over 5 years) and Satrix World (11/47 over 5 years) predictably outperform the vast majority of the 47 active global funds with 5 year track records (there may be others that have already folded in the past 5 years, thereby underestimating the outperformance of the passives), including the highly publicized and illustrious Allan Gray Orbis Global Equity Feeder Fund (28/47), as well as Prudential Global Equity Feeder Fund (20/47), Discovery Global Equity Feeder Fund (33/47), PSG Global Equity Feeder Fund (36/47), Investec Worldwide Equity Feeder Fund (37/47), Sanlam Global Equity Feeder Fund 46/47. Makes you think, doesn’t it? http://www.fundsdata.co.za/scripts/home/QuickRank.aspx?c=Global–Equity–General&period=5yr The Sygnia S&P 500 and Sygnia World are dividend distributing ETFS (jolly nice for an income), while the Satrix World is a roll-up fund, forcing you to sell ETFs (with potential CGT implications) when you want some money to live on. The evidence indicates that briggest minds in the financial service industry in SA cannot allocated money with greater success than a passive/unbiased low-cost approach, including in the funds where you would think they have their greatest chance of doing so!
The top voted comments of the past 7 days.
  1. Troglodyte

    13 February 2019 @ 6:07 am
  2. So we ignore the population explosion from 1970 to 2015? An explosion that has no bearing on current issues in SA today? Why is the media so hell bent in attempting to spin or ignore the problem that SA is greatly overpopulated? I smell something and it isn't mud.
  3. Swazi

    15 February 2019 @ 9:07 pm
  4. So, a taxpayer-funded regulator determined that the taxpayer pays for a taxpayer-funded monopoly for using taxpayer funds to unfairly compete with a tax-paying company. SA has reached new levels of absurdity.
  5. Sensei

    18 February 2019 @ 7:45 am
  6. The state of the infrastructure is a direct consequence of employment policy at government institutions. In all civilized nations, only the best-qualified individuals are considered for crucial positions. The qualification standards for employees at utilities determine the standard of service delivery by that utility. There is no alternative to this reality. The qualification standards for a South African government- or municipal employee, ward-counselor or worker at a SOE is the ability to draw a cross on a piece of paper. The social group who draws the most crosses is handed the power to appoint themselves in critical positions. The ability to make a cross on paper is regarded as the highest qualification standard in South Africa. Voting for the ANC automatically qualifies individuals for critical posts at crucial institutions. The lack of water and electricity, the implosion of medical services and the sewage running down the streets are the physical manifestations of the human capital involved. So, the problem is much worse than described in this article. The real underlying problem is not the implosion of service delivery. The real problem is the loss of human capital. The right to vote is the conduit that equalizes, and brings equilibrium between the level of sophistication of infrastructure and service delivery on one hand, and the level of sophistication of the voting majority on the other hand. This equilibrium has not been found yet, the process is ongoing.......
  7. langezand

    13 February 2019 @ 1:48 am
  8. We have to plan for the future , yet the past is our guiding light . Hoping the past market cycles will be repeated , and that the JSE will rebound to provide a 10% plus return on investment , is unfortunately just that ...a hope and a wish . Massive mismanagement of the SA economy during the past 20 years , is now coming home to roost . For the JSE to to provide above average results , the economic fundamentals must be in place for companies to make excellent profits , which is not happening now . So , history , unfortunately , this time around , is not going to assist us , and we have to plan for the actual SA scenario we are facing .
  9. David Brent

    18 February 2019 @ 7:12 am
  10. But surely the change of Grahamstown's name should have solved it's water "challenges"?
  11. Colson

    15 February 2019 @ 10:51 pm
  12. More wasted tax-payer money. The really, really strange thing about this country is that those who pay tax have come to the stark realisation that they should not expect anything in return whereas those that don't pay tax expect everything. I guess it is just the way payers and non-payers were brought up!
  13. Notwarren

    15 February 2019 @ 2:10 am
  14. Not even worth analysing. Come on MW you can do better. There is nothing there! The PIC paid R4.3bn for nothing. Virtually the only earnings of this business is the interest on the self same money the PIC put in. To call it a Ponzi scheme would imply a level of sophistication that this bit of securities fraud does not have. How Surve is still walking free is beyond me.
  15. fakenews

    13 February 2019 @ 7:31 am
  16. So one million emigrated against 4 million who immigrate - hazard a wild guess at how much money and skills left the country with the one million who left compared to the four million who arrived
  17. Danie van Parow

    14 February 2019 @ 6:15 am
  18. This drop in revenue collection must be of huge concern to our ANC government. How do people expect the politicians to make a dishonest living if they, the taxpayers, don't pay their tax ? People, if we do not all stand together and pay our tax diligently as required, then a rich part of our South African heritage and culture of theft and corruption will disapear forever and our disfunctional, failed state for which the ANC work so tirelessly, will go up in smoke.
  19. JayBeeBaby

    14 February 2019 @ 11:31 am
  20. During the 2018 illegal strike, many workers sabotaged power stations, and in terms of South African law, they should have been charged with treason. " In South Africa treason remains a common-law offence . The crime of high treason is defined as: “any conduct unlawfully committed by a person owing allegiance to a state with the intention of: • overthrowing the government of the Republic; • coercing the government by violence into any action or inaction; • violating, threatening or endangering the existence, independence or security of the Republic; • changing the constitutional structure of the Republic.” But, Pravin Gordhan granted the saboteurs indemnity from prosecution and a R10 000 bonus. The ANC has already shown that it will do anything the unions demand (including indemnity for acts of sabotage and treason) - so how will it be different this time. Especially in an election year.
  21. talker

    15 February 2019 @ 9:02 pm
  22. love the headline "blow for SAA". In case you haven't noticed SAA has for quite a while not been able to generate any money, so the blows flow straight through to us. Should have been "another blow for SA taxpayers"
  23. Daviddebeer

    13 February 2019 @ 6:41 am
  24. Hmm. 1980 to 2018 seems to support the argument for an population exploion...
  25. Chop Your Dollar

    13 February 2019 @ 8:47 am
  26. Only god knows how many Zimbabweans are in SA. Never mind Malawians, etc etc. I'm not exaggerating when I say I hear Shona way more than any language except English where I live (northern JHB). If you trust StatsSA, I've got some oceanfront property in Sandton to sell you.
  27. Saibotkram1988

    18 February 2019 @ 11:47 am
  28. "The banks say the firm poses a ‘reputational risk’ for them as clients." Which basically means, 'We've known all along that you are completely corrupt to the core but now that everyone else does as well, we're out.' Nothing to see here.
  29. Sensei

    14 February 2019 @ 11:43 am
  30. When England was held at ransom by the unions, Baroness Margaret Thatcher had the resolve to break their backs. Who do we have to confront the unions and save the country? Cyril the "fighting for unity" Squirrel. Margaret Thatcher carried the flag of free market capitalism, private property and rule of law. She had a mandate from the majority of voters, that gave her the power to confront the unions. A socialist workers party who is in alliance with the unions, forms the government in South Africa. Cyril the unity crusader, has no power to confront the unions. On the contrary, the unions dictate his agenda. He will eventually print the money to pay the union members. He will steal the purchasing power of the currency in order to bribe the unions. The demise of Eskom heralds the final freedom from colonization and the official end of Western Civilization in South Africa. This is exactly what the ANC supporters wanted. The demise of Eskom and the bankruptcy of most municipalities is the ultimate manifestation of socialism. This is how socialism presents, and expresses itself among its supporters. This destruction is the practical manifestation of The Freedom Charter.
  31. saveSAagain

    13 February 2019 @ 4:58 pm
  32. Mike I love your articles and respect your research and knowledge, but I think this one you got 100% wrong! Half of Africa is in SA! There are no official numbers on illegal emigrants, but there are estimates of numbers between 20 and 30 million illegals. Then looking at the numbers we only have aprox. 5 million taxpayers of which high net worth tax payers are all leaving for Mauritius thanks to the brilliant communist Gordan who decided to tax us to death on all fronts! Nett effect is: less tax collection more theft and more demands of free education, free housing, free babies!!!! In 30 years from now we will have 100milj poor people in SA all wanting everything for free! Your population numbers are so far off, it's like saying we have an unemployment rate of 27%, although everyone knows it's bull...., people have stopped looking for jobs, so they don't count as unemployed. Well we have stopped counting the numbers that are coming over the borders because we do not have borders, how can you then trust any of your numbers, and to make it worse they have children here that are entitled to grants! I am sorry our biggest single problem in SA today is over population, stop kidding yourself take a drive through our country and open your eyes and then tell me our population is not exploding, regardless of the cause!
  33. pwgg

    18 February 2019 @ 6:51 am
  34. Another ANC disaster. In the past 25 years have they built a single new dam. Dep of Water Affairs has a R2 billion hole thanks to Nokkers.
  35. Rule9

    15 February 2019 @ 6:15 am
  36. It's so obviously a sweatheart, corrupt deal between Surve and Dan Matjila to loot public funds.
  37. Pamplona

    14 February 2019 @ 10:54 am
  38. ESKOM cannot be fixed. Why? Its premised on a power production model that dates from Victorian times, being coal. The speed and scale of renewable has made ESKOM redundant already and it is not a dying giant, it is already dead. Further, the'product' that it produces is mostly not paid for by the large municipalities, or stolen. It has debt that boggles the mind and its new mega-projects are abject failures and should be immediately shut down. WHEN ESKOM defaults, it will trigger bankruptcy cross-default via the ISDA regime and lead to a full SA sovereign debt default. This has only one ending, IMF intervention. This is a scientific and historical certainty. Nice words at SONA don't fix these sorts of problems
  39. Mandinean

    13 February 2019 @ 7:43 am
  40. In summary, too many comrades and cadres and too few cadavers?
The top commented articles of the past 7 days.
    Mike Schüssler / 13 February 2019 Fewer deaths, fewer births … there is no ‘population explosion’ in SA.
     64      59
    James-Brent Styan / 14 February 2019 Ramaphosa has no choice but to draw a line in the sand over the next few weeks.
     101      49
    Antoinette Slabbert / 13 February 2019 But much will depend on how the three individual assets are valued, and what portion of the utility’s crippling debt each is given.
     52      42
    Hilton Tarrant / 18 February 2019 The National Water and Sanitation Master Plan is sombre reading.
     348      40
    Duncan McLeod / 15 February 2019 The company plans to spend R500m covering Johannesburg with CCTV systems.
     384      39
    Ingé Lamprecht / 14 February 2019 Corporate and personal income tax collections have slowed since October.
     35      28
    Olivia Kumwenda-Mtambo and Wendell Roelf, Reuters / 14 February 2019 Ministry warns of Eskom liquidity challenges.
     33      26
    Paul Vecchiatto, Bloomberg / 13 February 2019 Medupi and Kusile are still years away from completion and their projected costs have more than doubled.
     15      25
    Ciaran Ryan / 14 February 2019 Explosion at Gloria Coal Mine leaves 22 suspected cable thieves trapped underground.
     42      22
    Hilton Tarrant / 15 February 2019 Some arguments ignore the data, many are simply missing the point …
     93      19
    Hilton Tarrant / 13 February 2019 Why is there no coordinated management of this crisis?
     25      18
    Ingé Lamprecht / 15 February 2019 Ramaphosa tries to allay fears that splitting the power utility will lead to privatisation, job losses.
     14      18
    Suren Naidoo / 15 February 2019 Settlement brings final end to 14-year spat.
     117      18
    Ray Mahlaka / 18 February 2019 Treasury proposals a sign of its determination to get tough.
     105      18
    Mamokgethi Molopyane / 12 February 2019 Those at the bottom of society reflect a country's health – and right now, South Africa is gravely ill.
     20      18
    Patrick Cairns / 13 February 2019 They can, but there are good reasons to believe that it's becoming less likely.
     125      17
    Patrick Cairns / 18 February 2019 The importance of good capital allocation.
     48      16
    Barbara Curson / 15 February 2019 Defamation suit simply a 'ruse to deflect from the real crisis' - #TakeBackTheTax.
     19      16
    Emma Rumney, Reuters / 18 February 2019 The banks say the firm poses a 'reputational risk' for them as clients.
     105      16
    Barbara Curson / 15 February 2019 The deal has been done, but is the PIC’s controversial asset capable of using the R4.3bn productively and profitably?
     42      15
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