Trending on Moneyweb
Top articles and comments, based on the Moneyweb Insiders activity.
The top shared articles of past 24hours.
    Faisel Mkhize / 22 February 2020 Although longer-term loans may address affordability concerns, there are also other factors to consider.
     13      3
    Melitta Ngalonku / 21 February 2020 SA sales expected to remain constrained in the medium term.
     9      8
    Wendell Roelf, Reuters / 21 February 2020 Fishermen are struggling to make ends meet.
     8      3
    Mfuneko Toyana and Emma Rumney, Reuters / 21 February 2020 Traders remain cautious before a closely watched budget speech next week.
     7      1
    Colleen Goko, Bloomberg / 21 February 2020 Many investors expect South Africa to lose its last investment-grade rating. Their only question is when.
     5      3
    Misheck Mutize / 22 February 2020 African governments would venture offshore a lot less if domestic bond markets were active and liquid.
     3      3
    Stephen Kalin and Andrea Shalal, Reuters / 22 February 2020 OECD close to deal on minimum level of tax for digital firms.
     2      0
    Jeff Sutherland, Bloomberg / 21 February 2020 The tallies for Singapore and Japan have topped 85.
     1      1
    Moneyweb / 21 February 2020 Jan Oberholzer - hoofbedryfsbeampte van Eskom & Mercia Grimbeek – Chair, SAWEA
     1      0
    Tanisha Heiberg, Reuters / 21 February 2020 Pressing ahead with disposal plans.
     1      0
The top shared articles of the past 7 days.
    Suren Naidoo / 20 February 2020 It was South Africa’s leading discount retailer before its costly move into fresh food.
     540      17
    Roy Cokayne / 20 February 2020 'No justification in a country like South Africa for government to subsidise the middle class'.
     446      54
    Roy Cokayne / 18 February 2020 Vehicle manufacturers react with outrage to draft guidelines published by Competition Commission.
     404      32
    Suren Naidoo / 18 February 2020 As its R14bn forerunner winds down.
     298      18
    Roy Cokayne / 17 February 2020 But dubious about government’s ability to deliver.
     256      28
    Adriaan Kruger / 19 February 2020 Surely there are more than just 'developed' or 'developing' economy categories?
     240      42
    Barbara Curson / 21 February 2020 Mounting evidence of ill-gotten gains surely makes applying the law the easiest way to boost revenue collections.
     231      33
    Hilton Tarrant / 21 February 2020 As economy bites, contracting medical scheme market catches up…
     206      18
    Stealthy Wealth / 17 February 2020 It depends on your spending habits.
     140      21
    Suren Naidoo / 17 February 2020 Around R188m in payment obligations due in March, largely to preference shareholders.
     133      11
    Roy Cokayne / 21 February 2020 The difference in safety performance between Nissan NP300 Hardbody models may be a matter of life and death.
     116      35
    Suren Naidoo / 20 February 2020 Balwin Properties CEO Steve Brookes wants to roll-out six man-made Crystal Lagoons at multi-billion-rand mega residential developments.
     116      8
    Hilton Tarrant / 17 February 2020 The writing has been on the wall for the airline since 2016 …
     105      25
    Yanga Nozibele / 16 February 2020 And how to avoid them.
     101      3
    Ciaran Ryan / 20 February 2020 It’s time to sit down and see if there’s a way to catch up.
     87      0
The top shared articles of the past month.
    Larry Claasen / 4 February 2020 Even if reforms get on track, global difficulties loom.
     1158      35
    Barbara Curson / 7 February 2020 Proposed Eskom bailout amounts to a massive 14% haircut.
     944      67
    Suren Naidoo / 12 February 2020 Around 500 workers received Section 189 letters on January 31 proposing termination of their employment.
     634      22
    Stealthy Wealth / 30 January 2020 Deciphering the investment choices.
     565      41
    Suren Naidoo / 20 February 2020 It was South Africa’s leading discount retailer before its costly move into fresh food.
     540      17
    Moneyweb / 10 February 2020 Pierre Venter from Basa discusses possible ‘untoward consequences’ for borrowers, lenders and the overall economy.
     518      33
    Roy Cokayne / 20 February 2020 'No justification in a country like South Africa for government to subsidise the middle class'.
     446      54
    Jesse Morgans / 4 February 2020 The question of paying off debt or contributing to retirement savings is something many South Africans wonder about.
     409      0
    Roy Cokayne / 18 February 2020 Vehicle manufacturers react with outrage to draft guidelines published by Competition Commission.
     404      32
    Stephen Katzenellenbogen / 12 February 2020 Asset allocation will play a big role in your investment/retirement outcome.
     372      0
    Adriaan Kruger / 12 February 2020 Who will keep paying mortgage bonds if or when government takes property?
     370      77
    Patrick Cairns / 5 February 2020 As a way to prevent job losses.
     346      73
    Paul Burkhardt, Bloomberg / 15 February 2020 By offering voluntary severance packages to personnel aged 60 to 62.
     343      7
    Trevor Lee / 30 January 2020 Fund managers have a degree of ‘wiggle room’ to escape the harshest volatility.
     335      0
    Preston Narainsamy / 2 February 2020 The early bird gets the worm - even when investing.
     323      12
The latest 15 comments.
  1. rfjock

    22 February 2020 @ 1:20 pm
  2. @reality

    Oh cry me a river dude…

    Everyone is obliged to register for, and pay their taxes. Unless you are condoning tax avoidance…? Bet you are the first at the dinner table to b1tch and moan about crime in SA…

    There are many stories about long term tenmants losing their leases due to greedy landlords making a quick (undeclared) buck on AirBnB. This is particularly prevalent in Grennpoint/Seapoint…

    Many are elderly people with no-where else to go.

    So catch a reality check, poepel.

  3. Mactheknife

    22 February 2020 @ 1:16 pm
  4. By the way…good article Mr Mutize – thank you.

  5. rfjock

    22 February 2020 @ 1:12 pm
  6. MiniMike’s cheap MSM rag still trying to to put out a negative narrative on Trump’s great success with the US economy…

    No-one with more than 2 brain cells believes the MSM anymore…

  7. casi_negro

    22 February 2020 @ 1:10 pm
  8. “So, have global emissions peaked? It’s unlikely and impossible to say for sure.”

    So although it is impossible to say,, you know,so you say no??

    Jane is an IYI..

  9. Chris Stoffel

    22 February 2020 @ 12:33 pm
  10. Could it be that African countries are a higher risk so they pay more for debt?

  11. Colson

    22 February 2020 @ 12:21 pm
  12. Active management fees have room to reduce but the fact remains unit trust fees in South Africa are compared to corresponding fees around the world and found to be average. So let me understand where you get the notion that fees in South Africa are excessive. If you are not happy with your fund manager’s fees why don’t you just switch to a cheaper option? My view is that consumer/investor preference for funds with lower-cost funds will force active managers to review and lower their fees. Isn’t that how market work with everything else? Don’t complain and be a victim take action.

  13. Colson

    22 February 2020 @ 12:14 pm
  14. Those racist interest rates!

  15. Corrie1

    22 February 2020 @ 11:24 am
  16. I have a few BnB clients and they declare their income. They also operate the least profitable enterprises in our client list which includes everybody from Architects to Spaza shops. Sorry, you will only hurt an already crumbling industry that is suffering due to bad press.

  17. Corrie1

    22 February 2020 @ 11:21 am
  18. There are professionals involved in schemes that are costing the country and taxpayer even more. The sad part is that nobody listens and the same SARS that is supposed to ensure that everyone pays what is owed, is part of it.

  19. Gothic100

    22 February 2020 @ 10:53 am
  20. Medical aids by law are non profit, and this is completely true. However medical aid administrators are not governed by the same laws and are the same as every single other company. So you need to differentiate between Discovery Medical aid and the listed JSE Discovery Ltd. Discovery administers other medical aid eg Tsogo, Remedi, LA Health, Bankmed, etc and make money of running these medical aids. They use on average between 25 to 30 % of the total medical aid premium you pay towards administration, meaning every 25 to 30 cents per Rand you pay is used for non medical expenses, and this is based on fact, the percentage varies according to different medical aids administrators but they are all relatively close. The problem is not the completely the medical aid, it’s the administrators who generate profit for them selves, and when these companies don’t deliver, shareholders start to have their say.

  21. raymondbc

    22 February 2020 @ 10:26 am
  22. I agree. South African consumers are morons. For companies trying to put quality on the shelves here can be frustrating.

  23. Africa Pragmatist

    22 February 2020 @ 9:50 am
  24. Yes, they are the ones parking a R500 000 car outside a R500 000 home.

  25. cheetah58

    22 February 2020 @ 9:36 am
  26. Johan, have you tried ‘Interpretation Note No 18’ ? which is a mere 140 pages of explanation.

    Interpreting the law is one thing, finding the right box in the return to get the intended result is another…

  27. cheetah58

    22 February 2020 @ 9:12 am
  28. Yes. That’s 100k per parent, not per kid ; and assuming no other donations in that tax year.

  29. edalsg

    22 February 2020 @ 9:10 am
  30. Pure and Simple Idiots / Ego boosters.
    NEVER buy a car on credit : If you cant afford to pay cash ,then you cant afford that car : Its simple really .

The top voted comments of the past 7 days.
  1. Hachmet

    19 February 2020 @ 2:57 am
  2. The very interesting concept of inequality in South Africa is the fact that we have millions of foreigners for poorer countries coming to South Africa. This inflow of people influence our local jobs and small businesses negatively.
    For too long the pendulum of human rights over swang too far to allow illegal immigrants over the world to migrate to “richer” and politically/economically (capitalist) countries. This allowed socialist countries to misuse their powers to enrich their corrupt leaders, furthermore the rich countries became the scapegoat for corrupted poor countries. This is exactly what happened to South Africa after 1994. Instead of growing a wealthy economy for South Africans, we sit today with millions from poor countries which burden our citizens even more.
    State capture furthermore is evidence of our leaders doing exactly what happens in corrupt socialist countries.
    Socialism is the root evil for corruption, and corruption on grand scale is the first sign of socialism’s failure as a economic system.

  3. ps

    19 February 2020 @ 7:14 am
  4. Foreigners are not the problem. The locals are the problem – lazy, entitled, uneducated, unemployable and violent. It isn’t foreigners setting universities and municipalities alight. Foreigners weren’t disrupting SONA. Foreigners are a convenient excuse used by a population unwilling to acknowledge its own failings and inadequacies.

  5. eaeh

    20 February 2020 @ 5:41 am
  6. Why is it so difficult for those in power to understand that rail transport is the life line of any country. Transporting goods and people affordably by rail brings economic prosperity and curb road maintenance drastically by keeping trucks, many overloaded, off the roads. The answer is simple, get professionals to run Metro Rail. Ah but getting professionals is a problem with our dysfunctional schooling system and present dysfunctional managers.

  7. Notwarren

    20 February 2020 @ 1:14 am
  8. Since when is the compcom expressing opinions on political issues?

  9. Platham

    20 February 2020 @ 6:41 am
  10. This is rather typical of utterances from the South African “ignoratti”. Take a successful organization and mess it up instead of using it as an example to correct the failings in those organizations (usually SOE’s) already messed up beyond belief.

  11. casper1

    19 February 2020 @ 6:36 am
  12. We are not a developing country – we are a Regressive country !!!!

  13. Darwin

    19 February 2020 @ 6:39 am
  14. @ Hachment, I agree with your point regarding socialism and its inevitable path to economic ruin and totalitarianism. However, I disagree regarding foreigners who come to SA. The person who has the means, planning ability, self-discipline and sheer guts to migrate from (say) Somalia to SA, to come and establish a little shop in Diepsloot, is exactly the kind of person you want in your country. The next generation of his/her family will be educated and contribute useful skills and probably substantial income tax to society. Much more than the stereotypical languid, entitled, chip-on-the-shoulder, Saffa is ever likely to do.

  15. ps

    20 February 2020 @ 6:32 am
  16. How dare the middle class expect anything back for the taxes it pays. Its members should just STFU and allow government to continue to steal, destroy and sell off what’s left of SA to the highest bidder.

  17. Pamplona

    17 February 2020 @ 1:58 pm
  18. I thought VBS was the cadre wealth fund? I suppose now that its been emptied, they need another one …

  19. Sensei

    18 February 2020 @ 6:31 am
  20. The real challenge is to find a way to insulate the quality of service delivery from the quality of the intellectual capacity of the average voter. A democratic system enables people to change their entire community into a reflect their personal or private circumstances. This phenomenon is moving at great speed to transform the entire country to resemble the traditional rural homelands.

    When the right to vote was restricted in the industrialised part of South Africa, the few shaped the infrastructure to resemble their mindsets. Now that the right to vote is universal, the majority enforced their particular mindset on the shape of the infrastructure and service delivery.

    The problem is, those voters who destroyed service delivery do not like the consequences of their own actions. They protest and burn tyres to demonstrate their unhappiness with their own influence over service delivery! In short, they are protesting as a group, against their personal levels of intellectual capacity. What else can explain the situation?

    Now, the court came to their rescue and reversed the decision of the voters. The municipal council, that was elected by the voters, is disbanded by the courts. The court says, by implication, that the intellectual capacity of the average voter is far too inferior to allow him to demonstrate his wishes. The court says that the voters are not accountable. They are not compos mentis. You have the right to vote, but for your own sake, don’t use it!

    Privatisation of service delivery is the insulation that is needed to save service delivery from the average voter. A company is not a democratic system. He who has the most brainpower has the most votes. This is what we need to save the country from the ANC.

  21. Africa Pragmatist

    19 February 2020 @ 6:55 am
  22. Correct. And the real extent of the ANCs illegal immigrants problem is not known. It could be as much as 9m.

    But still the real elephant in the room keeping SA poor is corruption. ANC corruption.

  23. Africa Pragmatist

    15 February 2020 @ 9:29 pm
  24. This would not be the problem age group. Rather fire for non performance.

  25. casper1

    18 February 2020 @ 2:30 pm
  26. Ja no well fine — That did not take too long to bring out the begging bowl !!!!

  27. JustTheFacts

    19 February 2020 @ 8:23 am
  28. Great article, thank you Adriaan.

    You made a few comments to the effect that Donald Trump may actually be correct and ‘have a point’ here.

    You must must have missed your Political Correctness Indoctrination and Re-Education Sessions Adriaan!

    How very refreshing.

  29. Mmmm

    18 February 2020 @ 2:34 pm
  30. Did someone tell de Ruyter to take a hike?

    He is just like his bosses. Gime money.

    PAY THE BLOATED WORKFORCE OFF!! Before you start begging on the bosses behalf.

    He did not tell anyone that it is stupid to try and fix ESKOM and keep the 66% of the labourforce not required. What business sense has he got then??????? If he is trying to fix it on instruction from CR and Pravin rather just go boet. Take a hike.

The top commented articles of the past 7 days.
    Roy Cokayne / 20 February 2020 'No justification in a country like South Africa for government to subsidise the middle class'.
     446      54
    Adriaan Kruger / 19 February 2020 Surely there are more than just 'developed' or 'developing' economy categories?
     240      42
    Mfuneko Toyana, Reuters / 18 February 2020 Debt doesn't just disappear - it creates a very significant risk to the sovereign: Andre de Ruyter.
     73      36
    Roy Cokayne / 21 February 2020 The difference in safety performance between Nissan NP300 Hardbody models may be a matter of life and death.
     116      35
    Barbara Curson / 21 February 2020 Mounting evidence of ill-gotten gains surely makes applying the law the easiest way to boost revenue collections.
     228      32
    Roy Cokayne / 18 February 2020 Vehicle manufacturers react with outrage to draft guidelines published by Competition Commission.
     404      32
    Roy Cokayne / 17 February 2020 But dubious about government’s ability to deliver.
     256      28
    Mamokgethi Molopyane / 19 February 2020 Limited understanding about economics and the role it plays in moving a country forward emerged during and after Sona.
     15      25
    Hilton Tarrant / 17 February 2020 The writing has been on the wall for the airline since 2016 …
     105      25
    Ciaran Ryan / 18 February 2020 Dysfunctional metros and municipalities could start falling like dominoes.
     63      22
    Stealthy Wealth / 17 February 2020 It depends on your spending habits.
     140      21
    Roy Cokayne / 19 February 2020 Says investments must grow from 13% to 30% of total spending by 2030 to achieve NDP growth targets.
     41      19
    Suren Naidoo / 18 February 2020 As its R14bn forerunner winds down.
     298      18
    Hilton Tarrant / 21 February 2020 As economy bites, contracting medical scheme market catches up…
     205      18
    Suren Naidoo / 20 February 2020 It was South Africa’s leading discount retailer before its costly move into fresh food.
     540      17
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